CVS New Beauty Campaign

Hayley Royal, Photoshop Artist

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It’s everywhere: on magazine covers, television commercials, and even in-store advertisements. Digitally altered photos cover our country, displaying models of both genders with what is often deemed the perfect appearance. The technology available today allows companies to totally transform the person in the picture, portraying individuals with flawless skin, perfectly proportional features, and overall tiny bodies. This shift towards digitally modified models has caused a confusion across the nation over which pictures being promoted are real and which are only partially accurate of the model or product. Drug store CVS, however, has decided to do its part in ending the use of altered pictures, hopefully returning the country to realistic appearance goals.

Beginning in 2018, the company began Beauty Mark, an initiative that demonstrates what they refer to as “real beauty”. With this, CVS pledged to advertise its own cosmetic products with only pictures that have skipped any kind of modification or photoshop. This week, however, the company took its campaign ever further, adding a feature to all advertisements for all brands to signal whether the model in the photo had any kind of digital modification. The company hopes this change will make it easier for consumers to recognize what the cosmetic product actually does, as opposed to any enhancements made on a computer.  On its website, the company states, “We’re taking part in a movement to change the industry, and we’ve asked our partner brands to join us.”

While no brand has pledged to take the same steps as CVS, the company’s pledge to create only realistic beauty standards has been met with applause from the public.

It’s everywhere: on magazine covers, television commercials, and even in-store advertisements. Digitally altered photos cover our country, displaying models of both genders with what is often deemed the perfect appearance. The technology available today allows companies to totally transform the person in the picture, portraying individuals with flawless skin, perfectly proportional features, and overall tiny bodies. This shift towards digitally modified models has caused a confusion across the nation over which pictures being promoted are real and which are only partially accurate of the model or product. Drug store CVS, however, has decided to do its part in ending the use of altered pictures, hopefully returning the country to realistic appearance goals.

Beginning in 2018, the company began Beauty Mark, an initiative that demonstrates what they refer to as “real beauty”. With this, CVS pledged to advertise its own cosmetic products with only pictures that have skipped any kind of modification or photoshop. This week, however, the company took its campaign ever further, adding a feature to all advertisements for all brands to signal whether the model in the photo had any kind of digital modification. The company hopes this change will make it easier for consumers to recognize what the cosmetic product actually does, as opposed to any enhancements made on a computer.  On its website, the company states, “We’re taking part in a movement to change the industry, and we’ve asked our partner brands to join us.”

While no brand has pledged to take the same steps as CVS, the company’s pledge to create only realistic beauty standards has been met with applause from the public.

 

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