The BlacKkKlansman

The BlacKkKlansman

Eli Bernstein, Honest Guy

This movie was created at one of the most critical times in our country’s history, the
middle of a presidency run by Donald Trump.

This movie depicts the tale of Ron Stallworth, a Colorado Springs police officer who
infiltrates the local chapter of the KKK. Oh yeah, he’s also a black man. Sometime later,
while reading the city newspaper, Ron happens on an ad for people to join a
local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan. Much to his fellow officers surprise, Ron calls
the KKK in response to the ad and sets into motion a brilliant scheme – one
where he will converse with the Klan over the phone and his partner Flip
Zimmerman (Adam Driver) – a white Jewish man – will pose as him, when the
Klan wants to meet up in person. Ron’s plan works so well that, before long, he
even finds himself talking with David Duke (Topher Grace), the infamous, Grand
Dragon of the KKK.
As the movie progresses we see the harsh reality of this story…It’s still
happening. This kind of blind, disgusting racism is still affecting our country
today.
Spike Lee, I believe, tried to do way too much. He wanted to put as many
influential messages as he could! This led to some of the plot threads here
(especially, the relationship between Ron and Patrice) come off feeling
undercooked, as a result of the film prioritizing its messages over its narrative.
The movie is more interested in observing how their ideals evolve (or don't
evolve) over the course of their experiences here. Washington, who is the son of
Lee's frequent leading man Denzel Washington, is perfectly engaging as the
movie's protagonist and has solid chemistry with the actors around him (Driver
and Harrier in particular), making Ron's journey all the more interesting to follow.
All in all, I think it’s a great movie with a great message behind it: “If we are
not for ourselves…who is?” I think that this quote goes for this movie quite easily.
We got to see the college union attempt to stand up for themselves and become
learned about their situations. I give this movie a 9/10, you can see
what it wanted to do and it did that that very well.