Thousands of Jellyfish Wash Up on South Florida Beach

Thousands of Jellyfish Wash Up on South Florida Beach

Felicia Dattilo, Staff Writer

This April, thousands of small jellyfish called Valella, or Blue Sailors, invaded Hallandale Beach in southern Florida, around 18 miles north of Miami. These jellyfish’s bodies are designed to allow them to sail away from the shore, but their fins can unfortunately cause them to be carried in the wrong direction during strong winds. CNN meteorologist Allison Chincar reported that they are brought to the shore by strong winds and current, but there is no way to predict when they will arrive. City officials say this event happens around every three years and they are currently flying their purple dangerous sea life flags.
Despite the Velella jellyfish posing no threat to humans, they often travel with Portugese man-of-war jellyfish, which have a painful sting. City officials are advising that people not rub their eyes or put their fingers in their mouths if they have handled one of these Vellela jellyfish. Officials also said that an effort to clean the jellyfish is also underway. Public works beach tractors are currently attempting to rake up the jellyfish, but many continue to wash up. The process will be gradual, but the jellyfish do not currently pose a threat to the beach.